Sinshe GUNAWAN - Ahli Wasir & Anus Fistula
INFO : Kunjungan Pengobatan Sinshe GUNAWAN ke Jakarta Pada TGL: 05 - 06 NOVEMBER 2011 - Daftar Segera Untuk Mendapatkan Kesembuhan Total (Terbatas)....
Others
Others

View Sinshe GUNAWAN in a larger map
Categories
Testimonial
miya sovina
Saya mengalami bab yang keras sekali pada saat hamil, sampai suatu saat mengalami sakit yang luar biasa. Setelah melahirkan walaupun bab saya sudah tidak keras, tetap saja saya merasakan sakit. Awalny... detail

Joko Haryanto
Terima kasih berkat pengobatan dari pak Gunawan, keluhan wasir saya sudah berkurang dan sembuh. Mohon di kirimkan photo ke email berikut sebagaimana pembicaran terdahulu. Terima kasih atas bantuan pen... detail

Brian Manope - Bitung Barat
Sebelum berobat ke Pak Gunawan, saya sudah menderita anus fistula selama 4 tahun lebih, setiap kali kumat sakit sekali, sampai saya tidak dapat bekerja. Setelah saya disuruh Bos saya untuk berobat k... detail

» isi testimonial
» lihat testimonial

Artikel Gambar 2011 -2012 English) » Staph Infection

Urut berdasarkan

Staph Infection: Symptoms, Causes, Treatment and Prevention Tips


What Is Staphylococcus?

Staphylococcus is a group of bacteria that can cause a multitude of diseases as a result of infection of various tissues of the body. Staphylococcus is more familiarly known as Staph (pronounced "staff"). Staph-related illness can range from mild and requiring no treatment to severe and potentially fatal. Over 30 different types of Staphylococci can infect humans, but most infections are caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Staphylococci can be found normally in the nose and on the skin (and less commonly in other body locations) of 25%-30% of healthy adults. In the majority of cases, the bacteria do not cause disease. However, damage to the skin or other injury may allow the bacteria to overcome the natural protective mechanisms of the body, leading to infection.

 

Who Is at Risk for Staph Infections?

Anyone can develop a Staph infection, although certain groups of people are at greater risk, including newborn infants, breastfeeding women, and people with chronic conditions such as diabetes, cancer, vascular disease, and lung disease. People who inject drugs or medications, or have skin injuries or disorders, intravenous catheters, or surgical incisions, and those with a weakened immune system all have an increased risk of developing Staph infections.

 

What Types of Diseases Are Caused by Staph?

Skin infections are the most common type of disease produced by Staphylococcus. Staph infections of the skin can progress to impetigo (a crusting of the skin) or cellulitis (inflammation of the connective tissue under the skin, leading to swelling and redness of the area). In breastfeeding women, Staph can result in mastitis (inflammation of the breast) or in abscess of the breast. Staphylococcal breast abscesses can release bacteria into the mother's milk. When the bacteria enter the bloodstream and spread to other organs (known as bacteremia or sepsis), a number of serious infections can occur such as staphylococcal pneumonia, infection of the heart valves (endocarditis, which can lead to heart failure), and osteomyelitis (severe inflammation of the bones). Staphylococcal sepsis is a leading cause of shock and circulatory collapse, leading to death, in people with severe burns over large areas of the body. When untreated, Staph aureus sepsis carries a mortality (death) rate of over 80%.

 

What Is Staph Food Poisoning?

Staph food poisoning is a type of food poisoning caused by infection with the Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacterium. The bacteria multiply in foods and produce a toxin even at refrigerator temperatures. The toxins may be present in dangerous amounts in foods that have no signs of spoilage, such as a bad smell. Most people get Staph poisoning by eating contaminated food. The most common reason for contamination is that the food has not been kept hot enough [140 F or above] or cold enough [40 F or below]. Foods that are associated with Staph food poisoning include meats, poultry and egg products, salads (egg, tuna, chicken, potato, macaroni), bakery products (cream filled), sandwich fillings, and milk and dairy products.

 

How Are Staph Infections Diagnosed?

In cases of minor skin infections, staphylococcal infections are commonly diagnosed by their appearance without the need for laboratory testing. More serious staphylococcal infections such as infection of the bloodstream, pneumonia, and endocarditis require culturing of samples of blood or infected fluids. A sample of the infected wound (either a small biopsy of skin or pus taken with a swab) or of the blood must be obtained to grow the bacteria in the microbiology laboratory. Once the Staph is growing, the organism is tested to determine which antibiotics will be effective for treating the infection. A culture of skin lesions is especially useful in recurrent or persistent cases of skin infection, in cases of antibiotic failure, and in cases that present with advanced or aggressive infections.

 

What Does Staphylococcus aureus Bacteria Look Like?

This highly magnified electron micrograph depicted numbers of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, which were found on the luminal (inside) surface of an indwelling catheter. Of importance is the sticky-looking substance woven between the round cocci bacteria, which is composed of polysaccharides and is known as “biofilm.” This biofilm has been found to protect the bacteria that secrete the substance from attacks by antimicrobial agents such as antibiotics, resulting in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA.

 

What Is Antibiotic-Resistant Staph aureus?

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, known as MRSA, is a type of Staphylococcus aureus that is resistant to the antibiotic methicillin and other drugs in the same class, including penicillin, amoxicillin, and oxacillin. MRSA is one example of a so-called "superbug," an informal term used to describe a strain of bacteria that has become resistant to the antibiotics usually used to treat it. MRSA first appeared in patients in hospitals and other health facilities, especially among the elderly, the very sick, and those with an open wound (such as a bedsore) or catheter in the body (health-care-associated MRSA or HA-MRSA). MRSA has since been found to cause illness in the community outside of hospitals and other health facilities and in this case is known as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). MRSA in the community is associated with recent antibiotic use, sharing contaminated items, having active skin diseases or injuries, poor hygiene, and living in crowded settings.

 

What Are Complications of Staph Infections?

Scalded skin syndrome is a potentially serious side effect of infection with Staph bacteria that produce a specific protein which loosens the "cement" holding the various layers of the skin together. This allows blister formation and sloughing of the top layer of skin. If it occurs over large body regions, it can be deadly, similar to a large surface area of the body having been burned. It is necessary to treat scalded skin syndrome with intravenous antibiotics and to protect the skin from dehydration if large areas peel off. The disease occurs predominantly in children but can occur in anyone. It is known formally as staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome.

 

How Are Staph Infections Treated?

Minor skin infections are usually treated with an antibiotic ointment such as a nonprescription triple-antibiotic mixture. In some cases, oral antibiotics may be given for skin infections. Additionally, if abscesses are present, they are surgically drained. More serious and life-threatening infections are treated with intravenous antibiotics. The choice of antibiotic depends on the susceptibility of the particular staphylococcal strain as determined by culture results in the laboratory. Skin lesions may also be treated by drainage of the lesion under sterile conditions. Some Staph strains, such as MRSA, are resistant to many antibiotics.

Information
Product Scroller
Pembayaran
BCA
a/n: Eddy Gunawan    
BCA 3890274926
Mandiri
a/n: Eddy Gunawan
141-00-1093655-7
BNI

a/n. Rosana Rohana

3328888639


Login
Search
Search:
Others

© 2008 Sinshe GUNAWAN
Griya Asri kav. G-6/23 Pakuwon City
Telp : 031-5991439  Hp : 08123208863

Surabaya 60112


Toko Online